Daily Arguments

When teaching students to write persuasively (which Common Core now calls Argument), it's important for them to realize that they encounter the art of persuasion every day. After all, persuasion is nothing more than influencing someone else. In ancient Greece, Aristotle wrote abut how to persuade others. Three hundred years later, in Rome, Cicero wrote... Continue Reading →

Kid Logic

I first published this a year ago, but it is once again true. I added some of the kid logic from the recent V-Chip persuasive. It's that time of year again--we're teaching persuasive writing to our fifth and sixth graders. The students at our school are skilled writers. They get a lot of instruction and... Continue Reading →

Community Service

            Hooray for Community Service! by Taman             The voices of cheerful kids ring in your ears. As you look around, you see smiling kids chattering while piling toys and books into trucks for the needy. Even though some students and adults may think that community service is a waste of time, I strongly believe... Continue Reading →

Narratives vs. Persuasive, Part 2

  By definition, all writing taps into the creative side of the brain. My nearly-seventh grade students believe that narrative writing, however, is much more right-brain that persuasive.  As Nitya says, “Some students may feel that persuasive allows for you to express your opinion; however, most students agree that narrative writing lets your imagination run... Continue Reading →

Narrative vs. Persuasive

Recently I asked my class of sixth graders (well, it’s May—they are almost seventh graders) whether they preferred writing narrative or persuasive pieces. It was a fair question since each type of writing offers different structure and thought processes. This year’s class is awesome at writing persuasive essays; however, they almost unanimously chose narrative as... Continue Reading →

Daily Persuasion

When teaching students to write persuasively (which Common Core now calls Argument), it's important for them to realize that they encounter the art of persuasion every day. After all, persuasion is nothing more than influencing someone else. In ancient Greece, Aristotle wrote abut how to persuade others. Three hundred years later, in Rome, Cicero wrote... Continue Reading →

Supporting Your Arguments

   Persuasive writing is something I have been teaching with varying success for years. It is also a major component of the new Common Core Standards that are gradually being implemented nationwide. At its very root, students understand persuasion only at a very basic level. It takes skilled instruction to make them effective. When a... Continue Reading →

Know Your Audience

Persuasive writing can be hard for students for a number of reasons, but one of the toughest is learning to address their words to the right person. Let's face it. Thinking adults know that whining and stamping your foot will not work if you are asking the president for tax reform, although some politicians continue... Continue Reading →

Persuasive Query

Novelists are like football players.  They work hard every day for years to hone their skills and keep their dreams alive, but only a few of them ever see the big time.  Editors and agents sift through stacks of query letters for the next big novel while hopeful authors chew their nails and wait.  Although... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: